Tibetan Monks

  • by Ghita
  • Last Updated: 2020-01-16

Tibet is a holy land of Buddhism that attracted hundreds of tourists to travel to explore its profound Buddhist culture. In the past, the ratio was that 1 in 6 Tibetan men were Buddhist monks. Do you wanna know what does the life-like of the mysterious Tibetan monks or have you ever imagined the inside picture of Buddhist monasteries?

Actually, the Tibetan monks lead a simple and fairly peaceful life. By all means, They are dedicated to prayer and serve others and they will feel content and pleasure. Tibetan monks would never pursue the material comforts; their food is simple, involving some Tibetan bread, vegetables and loads of Tibetan tea. The Tibetan monks get along well with each other. Usually they joke with each other and talk with each other.

Playing Tibetan copper titaniums.

Tibetan copper titaniums are usually used in big ceremonies.

Monk in the Tibetan language is "trapa," which means “student” or “scholar." There are three kinds of Tibetan monks residents in the monastery, including monks, scholars, and lamas. Lamas are considered as the spiritual guides and master teachers who meditation techniques to disciples. In Tibetan Buddhism, they are regarded as "living gods" who possess supernatural powers that can slay demons and bring good fortune, wealth and good health. It is absolutely that Tibetan monks play a significant role in the lives of the Tibetan people. They not only conduct religious ceremonies but also taking care of the monasteries. 

The Scholastic Life of Tibetan Monks

Small monks start their scholastic life in the monastery where they will learn all the monastic disciplines, customs in monasteries and learn how to spell Tibetan Buddhist mantra and recite some basic prayers. And they need to serve their mentor or master for 3 years. Besides, they are going to take care of the chores of the monastery. Later, they will begin to start the 5 Buddhist classics, including Buddhist Logics, Heart Sutra, Madhyamika, Monastic Discipline, and Kusha-shū. 

Each monk is given two commandments, the Sami at the age of 10 and the bhikkhu at the age of 20. Under the auspices of the high monk living Buddha, the ordained person makes a solemn oath in front of the sutras and buddhas to abide by the precepts and practice for the sentient beings.

The daily life of Tibetan monks including the morning praying and afternoon praying

Buddhist debate at Sera Monastery.

The Daily Life of Tibetan Monks

Lamas are students living in Tibetan areas. Through the accumulation of knowledge and faith, complete the "pilgrimage road" in life.

The life of the lama begins early in the morning. The lamas, led by their leaders, say morning prayers in the hall. The morning prayer lasted about 2-3 hours, during which, for three times, hundreds of young monks lined up to pour butter tea and "tuba" porridge in the prayer hall. The monks ate and drank while chanting sutras, which was very interesting. After the morning praying,  the related family would offer some money to the monks as a particular way of giving. The next prayer is about 9 to 10 o 'clock, the lamas return to Zhacangs Hall to chant sutras and drink tea; At 3 or 4 o 'clock in the afternoon, each lama gathered in their Khangtsen (dorm) to chant sutras and drink tea.

In addition to the three prayer sessions, there are also three debate sessions per day.

Tibetan Monks live the same life. They read Buddhism scriptures, turn prayer wheels, Kowtow day after day, year after year to practice their extremely devote beliefs.

Most Tibetan monks live in 10 famous temples and monasteries such as the Jokhang Temple, Drepung Monastery, Sera Monastery, Tashilunpo Monastery, etc. Let's catch a glimpse of the top ten temples and monasteries in Tibet.

Chanting.

Chanting Buddhist scriptures is the daily practice of monks.

Living Buddhas
The reincarnation system of living buddhas is the most noticeable feature that distinguishes Tibetan Buddhism from other Buddhist schools. Living Buddha refers to a monk who has made some achievements in religious practice. After the establishment of the living Buddha reincarnation system, it has become a common way of inheritance adopted by all sects of Tibetan Buddhism.

The daily life of a young living Buddha is similar to that of a high school student. Morning classes begin at 6 am, followed by sutras and Buddha worship. Every day before breakfast, they recite the Buddhist sutras. In the morning, they generally touch the top for the Buddha to bless the believers and then debate the sutras. After lunch, they have a half-hour lunch break, and in the afternoon they continue to follow the teacher. In the dusk, they would discuss scriptures with other monks and learn from each other. In the evening, they would do homework until late at night.

If you are paying a visit to a living Buddha, you may offer a Hada to the living Buddha. Please bow over your head and offer the Hada with both hands. Then the living Buddha will take the Hada or take it and put it around your neck. You can't point your finger at the living Buddha. In a word, respect is the most important.

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